Back to Articles | « Previous | Next »
Home » Fisheries resilience in the Humboldt Current: one step closer to achieving sustainability

Fisheries resilience in the Humboldt Current: one step closer to achieving sustainability

Fisheries resilience in the Humboldt Current: one step closer to achieving sustainability

Evidence abounds showing that our world — and especially our seas — are changing. This is particularly notable in the Humboldt Current Large Marine Ecosystem, where we have seen changes in the distribution of fish stocks, temperature anomalies, wave surges, harmful algal blooms and much more. Yet, the Humboldt Current continues to be a source of fisheries productivity, livelihoods, economic development and food security for the two most important fishing nations in South America: Peru and Chile. The Humboldt Current unites these two countries, which is especially important as climate change impacts require a united front to combat them and a new way to manage fisheries.

For decades in Peru and Chile, the objective of good fisheries management has been sustainability. But due to the impacts of climate change, sustainability alone will not be enough. We need a more comprehensive view of sustainability — where we build our collective capacity to implement an ecosystems-based approach to fisheries management, which requires among several things, a greater collaboration at all levels of governance, plus the use of scientific tools to predict climate change impacts and carry out adaptive management accordingly. An online platform called Humboldt Resiliente supports and promotes this vision and the collective actions needed to meet the challenges ahead.

#globalwarming #climatechange #carboncompensation #bluesky #climateemergency #climatecrisis #blueskye #blueskyefoundation #compensate #greentechexchange #zerocarbon #climatenews #blueskyelife #elonmusk #billgates #greentech #nasa #nasaclimate #greenfacts
Sticker